UW Medicine Researchers Explore New Approaches to Treating Childhood Leukemia

October 1, 2018 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of childhood cancer, representing approximately 25% of cancer diagnoses in children 0-15. More than 3,000 new cases of ALL are diagnosed every year in the United States - and the incidence rate is rising. Read More

Stained bone marrow aspirate from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Gene for most common childhood cancer identified

September 9, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

September 9, 2013 An aberrant gene has been found to cause the most common childhood cancer in the world, pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The gene, PAX5, has long been known to be involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  The new study indicates a mutation in the gene alone is sufficient to eventually cause the disease, […] Read More

Gene variants that affect brain signal receptors may be one of several causes of schizophrenia symptoms

Brain cell signal network genes linked to schizophrenia risk in families

April 3, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

May 14, 2013 New genetic factors that predispose to schizophrenia have been uncovered in five families with several affected relatives. The psychiatric disorder can disrupt thinking, feeling, and acting, and blur the border between reality and imagination. Dr. Debby W. Tsuang, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Dr. Marshall S. Horwitz, professor of pathology, […] Read More