"The contribution of the women enrolling in this trial is invaluable and their decision to participate

Study’s ‘panomic’ approach to advanced breast cancer

March 3, 2014 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

Trial enrollees sought; effort involves sharing tumors’ responses to therapy in massive public online database. Ten women with advanced breast cancer will participate in one of the most intensive clinical trials ever conducted to identify molecular changes in individual tumors and to understand the strategies cancers adopt to escape chemotherapy. The study is seeking enrollees. University of […] Read More

UW researchers developing patch for damaged hearts

February 14, 2014 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

Five million Americans are living with heart disease, heart failure and 715,000 will have a heart attack this year. Now researchers at the University of Washington are working on a new way to repair damaged hearts with a biological band-aid. Read More

Childers displays a dog family tree showing those affected and unaffected by an inherited muscle disorder similar to X-linked myotubular myopathy in people.

Gene therapy leads to robust improvements in animal model of fatal muscle disease

January 22, 2014 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

January 22, 2014 Preclinical studies show that gene therapy can improve muscle strength in small- and large-animal models of a fatal congenital childhood disease know as X-linked myotubular myopathy. The findings, appearing  as the cover story in the January 22, 2014 issue of Science Translational Medicine, also demonstrate the feasibility of future clinical trials of gene therapy for […] Read More

Stained bone marrow aspirate from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Gene for most common childhood cancer identified

September 9, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

September 9, 2013 An aberrant gene has been found to cause the most common childhood cancer in the world, pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The gene, PAX5, has long been known to be involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  The new study indicates a mutation in the gene alone is sufficient to eventually cause the disease, […] Read More

Laboratory fruit flies are used for quick screening of candidate drug treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Burnt sugar-derivative reduces muscle wasting in fly and mouse models of muscular dystrophy

August 1, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , , ,

A trace substance in caramelized sugar, when purified and given in appropriate doses, improves muscle regeneration in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The findings are published Thursday (Aug. 1) in the journal Skeletal Muscle. Morayma Reyes, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, and Hannele Ruohola-Baker, professor of biochemistry and associate director of the Institute […] Read More

These images show differences in collagen build-up in two tissue samples.

Engineered biomaterial could improve success of medical implants

May 14, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged:

It’s a familiar scenario – a patient receives a medical implant and days later, the body attacks the artificial valve or device, causing complications to an already compromised system. Expensive, state-of-the-art medical devices and surgeries often are thwarted by the body’s natural response to attack something in the tissue that appears foreign. Now, University of […] Read More

Gene variants that affect brain signal receptors may be one of several causes of schizophrenia symptoms

Brain cell signal network genes linked to schizophrenia risk in families

April 3, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

May 14, 2013 New genetic factors that predispose to schizophrenia have been uncovered in five families with several affected relatives. The psychiatric disorder can disrupt thinking, feeling, and acting, and blur the border between reality and imagination. Dr. Debby W. Tsuang, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Dr. Marshall S. Horwitz, professor of pathology, […] Read More

Alya Red

Gene therapy may aid failing hearts

March 26, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , , ,

March 26, 2013 The potential of gene therapy to boost heart muscle function was explored in a recent University of Washington animal study. The findings suggest that it might be possible to use this approach to treat patients whose hearts have been weakened by heart attacks and other heart conditions. Michael Regnier, UW professor and […] Read More

A photo of the auditory sensory epithelium (called the organ of Corti) from an adult mouse. Hair cells (the sensory receptor cells for the ear) are labeled green by an antibody. Supporting cells are labeled red by another antibody. Cell nuclei are stained

UW researchers split hairs

February 27, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

The ability to hear and balance is in the roots. Both depend on hair cells, small sensory cells in the inner ear. Damage of hair cells leads to the loss of these functions. Though lower vertebrates such as birds have the ability to replace these hair cells, mammals like humans do not. Researchers from the […] Read More

A monitor displays human embryonic stem cells under a microscope at the South Lake Union Campus. Based on environmental conditions

Give your heart a break

December 3, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

UW geneticists have recently come across a discovery that can possibly help alleviate the high prevalence of heart disease, which could have profound implications in the field of medicine. Researchers, including Charles Murry, director of the Center for Cardiovascular Biology and co-director of the Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM), discovered the gene MEIS-2 […] Read More