Alya Red

Gene therapy may aid failing hearts

March 26, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , , ,

March 26, 2013 The potential of gene therapy to boost heart muscle function was explored in a recent University of Washington animal study. The findings suggest that it might be possible to use this approach to treat patients whose hearts have been weakened by heart attacks and other heart conditions. Michael Regnier, UW professor and […] Read More

A photo of the auditory sensory epithelium (called the organ of Corti) from an adult mouse. Hair cells (the sensory receptor cells for the ear) are labeled green by an antibody. Supporting cells are labeled red by another antibody. Cell nuclei are stained

UW researchers split hairs

February 27, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

The ability to hear and balance is in the roots. Both depend on hair cells, small sensory cells in the inner ear. Damage of hair cells leads to the loss of these functions. Though lower vertebrates such as birds have the ability to replace these hair cells, mammals like humans do not. Researchers from the […] Read More

A monitor displays human embryonic stem cells under a microscope at the South Lake Union Campus. Based on environmental conditions

Give your heart a break

December 3, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

UW geneticists have recently come across a discovery that can possibly help alleviate the high prevalence of heart disease, which could have profound implications in the field of medicine. Researchers, including Charles Murry, director of the Center for Cardiovascular Biology and co-director of the Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM), discovered the gene MEIS-2 […] Read More

Dr. Daniel Miller studies the molecular basis of muscle disorders in his lab at UW Medicine South Lake Union.

Mutations in genes that modify DNA packaging result in form of muscular dystrophy

November 19, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

November 19, 2012 A recent finding by medical geneticists sheds new light on how facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy develops and how it might be treated. More commonly known as FSHD, the devastating disease affects both men and women. FSHD is usually an inherited genetic disorder, yet sometimes appears spontaneously via new mutations in individuals with no […] Read More

Charles Sabine On Genetic Testing

November 8, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

Charles Sabine was a war correspondent with NBC for 25 years, covering conflicts all over the world — including Bosnia, Baghdad, and the Rwanda genocide. His reporting garnered him an Emmy and many other journalism awards. But four years ago his focus completely changed after getting a genetic test that revealed a lethal fate. Listen […] Read More

Dr. Michael Laflamme

UW researchers see work as step toward regenerating human heart

August 7, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

Two University of Washington scientists, using expertise in stem cells, cardiology, pathology, cell biology and the electrophysiology of the heart, are a step closer to their holy grail: regenerating a damaged heart. Human heart-muscle cells injected into the damaged heart of a guinea pig not only strengthened the heart’s ability to contract, the cells synchronized […] Read More

A colony of human embryonic stem cells.

Embryonic stem cells shift metabolism in a cancer-like way upon implanting in the uterus

March 23, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

March 23, 2012 Shortly after a mouse embryo starts to form, some of its stem cells undergo a dramatic metabolic shift to enter the next stage of development, Seattle researchers report today. These stem cells start using and producing energy like cancer cells. This discovery is published today in EMBO, the European Molecular Biology Organization journal. […] Read More

ISCRM's Director, Randy Moon, featured in The Scientist

November 1, 2010 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

Randall Moon has looked to tadpoles and stem cells for clues about embryonic development and cell fate. Now he has his eye on turning biology into therapy. It was one of those ‘eureka’ moments,” says Randy Moon of the experiment in which he first laid eyes on the awesome power of Wnt. Andrew McMahon of the Department […] Read More

A colony of human embryonic stem cells stained with fluorescent markers.

U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily lifts stem cell ban

September 9, 2010 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

In the Puget Sound Business Journal’s Sept. 6 print edition, I wrote about how the University of Washington is grappling with a recent court ruling that halted federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research (subscription required). The UW’s preliminary estimate was that it could lose $16 million in funding from the National Institutes of […] Read More