Alya Red

Gene therapy may aid failing hearts

March 26, 2013 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , , ,

March 26, 2013 The potential of gene therapy to boost heart muscle function was explored in a recent University of Washington animal study. The findings suggest that it might be possible to use this approach to treat patients whose hearts have been weakened by heart attacks and other heart conditions. Michael Regnier, UW professor and […] Read More

Dr. Daniel Miller studies the molecular basis of muscle disorders in his lab at UW Medicine South Lake Union.

Mutations in genes that modify DNA packaging result in form of muscular dystrophy

November 19, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

November 19, 2012 A recent finding by medical geneticists sheds new light on how facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy develops and how it might be treated. More commonly known as FSHD, the devastating disease affects both men and women. FSHD is usually an inherited genetic disorder, yet sometimes appears spontaneously via new mutations in individuals with no […] Read More

Charles Sabine On Genetic Testing

November 8, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: ,

Charles Sabine was a war correspondent with NBC for 25 years, covering conflicts all over the world — including Bosnia, Baghdad, and the Rwanda genocide. His reporting garnered him an Emmy and many other journalism awards. But four years ago his focus completely changed after getting a genetic test that revealed a lethal fate. Listen […] Read More

Dr. Michael Laflamme

UW researchers see work as step toward regenerating human heart

August 7, 2012 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

Two University of Washington scientists, using expertise in stem cells, cardiology, pathology, cell biology and the electrophysiology of the heart, are a step closer to their holy grail: regenerating a damaged heart. Human heart-muscle cells injected into the damaged heart of a guinea pig not only strengthened the heart’s ability to contract, the cells synchronized […] Read More

This is Dr. Charles "Chuck" Murry

Major Improvements Made In Engineering Heart Repair Patches From Stem Cells

October 9, 2009 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

University of Washington (UW) researchers, including Dr. Charles “Chuck” Murry, professor of pathology and bioengineering, have succeeded in engineering human tissue patches free of some problems that have stymied stem-cell repair for damaged hearts. The disk-shaped patches can be fabricated in sizes ranging from less than a millimeter to a half-inch in diameter. Until now, engineering tissue […] Read More

Drs. Randy Moon and Tony Blau

Seattle researchers applaud lifting of stem-cell restrictions

March 10, 2009 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

Researchers in Seattle who work with embryonic stem cells reacted with scientific relief and personal jubilation to President Obama’s decision Monday to reverse Bush-era restrictions that have hobbled their field for much of this decade. At the University of Washington, which has one of the nation’s largest concentration of researchers studying cells from human embryos, […] Read More

Test may predict cancer response to anemia drugs

June 1, 2008 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

A genetic test may help predict whether giving cancer patients anemia drugs could make their cancer worse, U.S. researchers said on Sunday. Over the past year and a half, eight late-stage clinical trials have shown that treatment with drugs known as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or ESAs, can have an adverse impact on cancer survival, the study’s […] Read More

Stem-cell breakthrough may help UW researchers

November 21, 2007 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

A new method for creating embryonic stem cells would put a host of research projects on a fast track at the University of Washington, where scientists have been limited by aging embryonic stem-cell lines that have been fading as if they’d been “through generations of photocopying.” At the UW’s Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative […] Read More

Researchers were able to use human-derived stem cells to grow a heart muscle graft (bottom) in a rat heart damaged by a heart attack. The human-derived cells incorporated with scar tissue (middle) and regular heart muscle cells (top).

Human derived stem cells can repair rat hearts damaged by heart attack

August 27, 2007 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , , ,

When human heart muscle cells derived from embryonic stem cells are implanted into a rat after a heart attack, they can help rebuild the animal’s heart muscle and improve function of the organ, scientists report in the September issue of Nature Biotechnology. The researchers also developed a new process that greatly improves how stem cells […] Read More

Repairing the retina: Stem-cell procedure promising

August 15, 2006 | Categories: Research | Tagged: , ,

Procedures using stem cells derived from human embryos could be utilized in a few years to repair disease-damaged retinas, new research by University of Washington scientists indicates. UW scientists reported Monday that they have successfully used the stem cells to treat diseased tissue in mouse retinas, a key portion of the eye. “This is a […] Read More